November 2019

On the sources of genius

Portraits of Euler, Gauss, Cantor, Ramanujan, Noether, Hilbert, Godel

[Portraits of (L-R) Euler, Gauss, Cantor, Ramanujan, Noether, Hilbert and Gö​del from the public domain]

In teaching elementary probability and statistics to undergraduates, I've been reading about some of the great mathematicians who are commemorated in the names of functions and constants. This has led me to ponder the role of religious worldviews in mathematical genius, and it's on that topic that I'd like to share a few thoughts today.  I hope that some readers here may have further knowledge and ideas to share.

Young People Serving the Technology god

Above is a photo of young people learning how to serve a very powerful and hypnotic god. Technology is a good gift from God but can easily become an idol! A bit of background to this.

The famous Russian revolutionary Trotsky (1879-1940) wrote that “Such is the power of science, that the average human-being will become an Aristotle, a Goethe, a Marx.  And beyond this new peaks will rise.” Trotsky believed in the power of science and technology to create a perfect world. He was tragically misled.

Intellectual servanthood

Image: 'Jesus Washing Peter's Feet' by Ford Madox Brown (1821–1893). Image freely available at https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Jesus_washing_Peter%27s_feet.jpgImage slightly cropped.

Intellectual servanthood

‘Sitting down, Jesus called the Twelve and said, “Anyone who wants to be first must be the very last, and the servant of all.”’ (Mark 9:35)